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Postposition (wei away) + postpositional phrase (út out) as its Complement
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The postposition wei away may take a postpositional phrase as its complement. The postposition út out normally refers to a source, but in combination with the noun kant side, it refers to a goal. The addition of the postposition wei away yields the source interpretation again.

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Consider the following sentences:

Example 1

a. De trein jaget Swol út
the train rushes Swol out
The train rushes out of Swol
b. De trein jaget de Swolster kant út
the train rushes the Swol area out
The train rushes into the direction of Swol

The effect of the noun kant direction is to reverse the meaning of the postposition. It normally denotes a source, but in combination with the noun kant side, the postpositional phrase as a whole denotes a goal. In order to express its antonym (that is, a source), the postposition wei away may be added to the idiomatic combination … kant út direction of …. Two examples are given below:

Example 2

a. Der kaam de Drachtster kant út wei, har in fyts fan efteren yn
there came the Drachten side out away them a bike from behind in
A bike approached them from behind from the direction of Drachten
b. Dy kant út wei, koe hja him net oankommen sjen
that side out away could she him not arrive see
From that side, she could not see him arrive

These examples involve a postposition (wei away) selecting another postpositional phrase as its complement. The postposition wei away denotes a path moving away from its source. So, a path moving away from the area around Drachten, as in (2a), entails a direction that is opposite to Drachten. Similarly, in the second sentence in (2), dy kant út wei denotes a direction that is opposite to the one denoted by dy kant út. In these cases, the beginning or end of the path is given by whatever the demonstrative article accompanying kant side, area refers to. The idiom kant út wei entails a path to a topical goal, just as the verb komme come entails movement to a topical goal. This goal is the location of the speaker or it may be the location of the topic. The latter is the case in a novel, for example. Consider the example below:

Example 3

Dy kant út wei, koe hja him net oankommen sjen
that side out away could she him not arrive see
From that side, she could not see him arrive

The topic is the sentential subject she, and the topical goal is the location of the sentential subject. The idiom kant út wei naturally collocates with the verb komme come.

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