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Infinitival
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Infinitival clauses can be subjects of predication if they are linked to the anticipatory pronoun it it.

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Infinitival clauses can be subjects of predication if they are linked to the anticipatory pronoun it it. In such cases, the adjective is often evaluative. The infinitival clause may either contain a clause-initial bare infinitive (an Imperativus-pro-Infinitivo), or a clause-final infinitive bearing the infinitival marker -(e)n. The Adjective Phrase (AP) may be accompanied by an Adposition Phrase (PP) argument built on the preposition fan of, as in (1) examples below. The PP argument fan Jan of Jan must be interpreted as coreferential with the subject of the infinitival clause. This PP argument bears the thematic role of theme, and it must be human:

Example 1

a. It is flau fan Jan [en klei oer it eksamen]
it is weak of Jan and complain about the exam
It is weak of Jan to complain about the exam
b. It is flau fan Jan [om oer it eksamen te kleien]
it is weak of Jan for about the exam to complain
It is weak of Jan to complain about the exam

The AP may also be accompanied by a PP argument built on the preposition foar for, as in (2) below. The argument in the foar for PP bears the semantic role of experiencer, and experiencers are always human (or animate). The PP argument foar Jan of Jan must be interpreted as coreferential with the subject of the infinitival clause:

Example 2

a. It is foar Jan net nedich [en helje dat eksamen]
it is for Jan not necessary to pass that exam
It is not necessary for Jan to pass that exam
b. It is foar Jan net nedich [om dat eksamen te heljen]
it is for Jan not necessary for that exam to pass
It is not necessary for Jan to pass that exam

The embedded clause is factive when it is selected by the predicate flau weak and non-factive when it is selected by the adjective nedich necessary.

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