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-ière
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-ière (/.'jɛ.rə/) is an unproductive non-native stress-bearing suffix found in nouns. There are two types of formations with the suffix: feminine counterparts of personal nouns in -ier (/je/), e.g. cabaretièrefemale cabaret artist (cf. cabaretier/ka.ba.rɛ.'tje/cabaret artist), and denominal names of things such as bonbonnièrebonbonnière (cf. bonbonchocolate). All -ière derivations are of common gender and have a plural form in -s; many of them may be loans from French.

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-ière is an unproductive non-native suffix. There are two types of formations with the suffix:

  • feminine counterparts of personal nouns with the non-native suffix -ier (/je/), e.g. cabaretièrefemale cabaret artist (cf. cabaretier/ka.ba.rɛ.'tje/cabaret artist) and costumièrewardrobe mistress;
  • denominal names of things such as bonbonnièrebonbonnière (cf. bonbonchocolate) and plafonnièreceiling light (cf. plafondceiling).
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As De Haas and Trommelen (1993: 214) observe, caissièrewoman cashier has no female counterpart. They also suggest that premièreopening night, barrièrebarrier and carrièrecareer may be analyzed as -ière derivations as well, even though there is no corresponding base noun in Dutch.

-ière (/'jɛ:.rə/) is stress-bearing with stress on the first syllable, which contains the phoneme /ɛ:/ that is found in loan words only. The suffix is cohering: syllabification does respect the morphological structure ( cabaretière/ka.ba.rɛ.'tjɛ:.rə/female cabaret artist).

All -ière derivations are of common gender, selecting the definite singular article de, and have a plural form in -s (cabaretièresfemale cabaret artists, plafonnièresceiling lights); many may be loans from French.

References:
  • Haas, Wim de & Trommelen, Mieke1993Morfologisch handboek van het Nederlands. Een overzicht van de woordvormingSDU Uitgeverij
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phonology
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morphology
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syntax
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    [64%] Afrikaans > Syntax > Verbs and Verb Phrases > 1. Characterization and classification
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