• Dutch
  • Frisian
  • Afrikaans
Show full table of contents
-elaar
quickinfo

-elaar/əlar/ is a native non-productive cohering suffix found in names for trees and bushes based on fruit names, carrying secondary stress (perelaar/ˈpe.rə.lar/pear tree < peerpear). Formations with -elaar are nouns of common gender, selecting the singular definite article de, and with a plural form in -s; they are more common in Belgium than in the Netherlands. If the stem ends in -el, haplology occurs (appelaarapple tree rather than *appelelaar < appelapple).

readmore

-elaar/əlar/ is a native suffix found in nouns of common gender denoting names of trees and plants bearing fruit. Input are fruit names of native (appelaarapple tree) or foreign (abrikozelaarapricot tree) origin; compound bases are attested as well (stoofperelaarcooking pear tree < stoofpeercooking pear). Stems ending in a vowel are impossible (*kiwilaarkiwitree). If the stem ends in -el, haplology occurs like in appelaarapple tree rather than *appelelaar < appelapple(Booij 2002: 185). The suffix carries secondary stress and is cohering: syllabification does not respect the morphological structure (abrikozelaar/a.bri.ˈko.zə.ˌlar/apricot tree < abrikoos/a.bri.ˈkos/apricot). The plural of formations in -elaar is formed by means of the suffix -s (vijgelaarsfig trees), occasionally -en (notelarennut trees) (De Haas and Trommelen 1993: 255).

[show extra information]
x

Rozelaarrose tree does not have a fruit name base; hazelaarfilbert, hazel tree is formed analogously on an older basis hazelfilbert, hazel tree(see Etymologiebank).

References:
  • Booij, Geert2002The morphology of DutchOxfordOxford University Press
  • Haas, Wim de & Trommelen, Mieke1993Morfologisch handboek van het Nederlands. Een overzicht van de woordvormingSDU Uitgeverij
Suggestions for further reading ▼
phonology
  • Dutch
  • Frisian
  • Afrikaans
Show more ▼
morphology
  • Dutch
  • Frisian
  • Afrikaans
  • -ier (French)
    [67%] Dutch > Morphology > Word formation > Derivation > Nouns > Nominal suffixes
  • -te
    [66%] Dutch > Morphology > Word formation > Derivation > Nouns > Nominal suffixes
  • -enis
    [65%] Dutch > Morphology > Word formation > Derivation > Nouns > Nominal suffixes
  • -aal and -eel
    [65%] Dutch > Morphology > Word formation > Derivation > Nouns > Nominal suffixes
  • -aar and -enaar
    [65%] Dutch > Morphology > Word formation > Derivation > Nouns > Nominal suffixes
  • In prenominal position
    [60%] Frisian > Morphology > Inflection > Adjectives
  • Number
    [60%] Frisian > Morphology > Inflection > Nouns
  • Cardinal numbers
    [60%] Frisian > Morphology > Inflection > Numerals
  • Case
    [60%] Frisian > Morphology > Inflection > Nouns
  • Gender
    [59%] Frisian > Morphology > Inflection > Nouns
Show more ▼
syntax
  • Dutch
  • Frisian
  • Afrikaans
  • 1.3. Inflection
    [58%] Dutch > Syntax > Verbs and Verb Phrases > 1 Characterization and classification
  • 1.2.1. Proper nouns
    [58%] Dutch > Syntax > Nouns and Noun Phrases > 1 Characterization and classification > 1.2. Classification
  • 1.3.1.6. Appendix: alternative means of expressing spatial relations
    [57%] Dutch > Syntax > Adpositions and adpositional phrases > 1 Characteristics and classification > 1.3. A semantic classification of adpositional phrases > 1.3.1. Spatial adpositions
  • 5.1.2.1. Proper nouns
    [57%] Dutch > Syntax > Nouns and Noun Phrases > 5 Determiners: articles and pronouns > 5.1. Articles > 5.1.2. Noun phrases without an article
  • 6.1.1.1. Simple and compound forms
    [57%] Dutch > Syntax > Nouns and Noun Phrases > 6 Numerals and quantifiers > 6.1. Numerals > 6.1.1. Cardinal numerals
Show more ▼
cite
print