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Phrases accompanying the missing verb and discourse context
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The missing verb is generally accompanied by a path argument, a manner of locomotion argument or a comitative expression.

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The missing verb is often accompanied by a path arguments, such as the one below:

Example 1

a. Jouke doarde net nei Grins ta
Jouke dared not to Grins to
Jouke did not dare to go to Grins

The verb can also be accompanied by a a manner of locomotion argument or a comitative phrase. An example with a manner of locomotion argument is given below:

Example 2

a. It is ferbean om op dizze dyk hurder as hûndert
it is forbidden for on this road faster than hundred
It is forbidden to drive faster than hundred on this road
b. It is ferbean om op dizze dyk hurder as hûndert te riden
it is forbidden for on this road faster than hundred
It is forbidden to drive faster than hundred on this road

An example with a comitative phrase is given below:

Example 3

a. Hja hie it net oan tiid om mei
she had it not to time for with
She did not have time to come along
b. Hja hie it net oan tiid om mei te gean
she had it not to time for with to go
She did not have time to come along

The discourse context also plays a role in determining the elidibility of the infinitive. Consider the following conversation:

Example 4

a. Wannear geane jim nei Grins ta?
when go you to Grins to
When will you go to Grins?
b. Wy hiene yn 'e holle om moarnier
we had in the head for tomorrow
We were thinking of going to Grins tomorrow

Note though that this example involves not just an elided infinitive but also an elided Adposition Phrase (PP). The same applies to the following example involving an adposition:

Example 5

a. Wannear geane jim fuort?
when go you away
When will you leave?
b. Wy hiene yn 'e holle om moarnier
we had in the head for tomorrow
We were thinking of leaving tomorrow

The elision involves the combination of a verb and a particle.

References:
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