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In matrix clauses of degree saso
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NCV2s may be found as the complement to the adverb of referential degree saso. The NCV2 itself expresses a consequence. It is not integrated in the superordinate structure. So matrix clauses of degree only feature UNCV2s, not INCV2s.

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If the matrix clause expresses a referential degree, then the NCV2 may be found as its complement, as in the example below:

Example 1

Hy is sa siik, hy kin dy hjoed net helpe
he is so ill he can you today not helpe
He is so ill, he cannot help you today

Of course, the complement is optional:

Example 2

Hy is sa siik!
he is so ill
He is so very ill!

The NCV2 has the interpretation of a result clause or a clause of effect, which effectively turns the matrix clause into the cause of the result. So the matrix and the UCV2 entertain a cause-effect relationship by juxtaposition. The degree adverb sosa contains an implied specification of the degree. This implied specification is equated with the propositional content of the result clause, the UCV2.

The causal nature of this construction can be brought out by a paraphrase of the sentence above:

Example 3

Hy kin dy hjoed net helpe want hy is sa siik
he can you today not helpe for he is so ill
He cannot help you today because he is so ill

The NCV2 is not syntactically integrated in the superordinate structure in which it is found, as is evidenced by the fact that it is impossible to set up a quantificational binding relation between a pronoun in the NCV2 clause and a binder in the superordinate clause:

Example 4

a. *Gjin dokter is sa siik, hy kin dy hjoed net helpe
no doctor is so ill he can you today not helpe
No doctor is so ill, he cannot help you today
b. *Elke atleet hat sa hurd trained, hy krige blessueres
every athlete has so hard trained he got injuries
Every athlete trained so hard, he got injured

Quantificational binding is allowed if the result clause has the form of a Verb-Final clause introduced by a complementiser:

Example 5

a. Gjin dokter is sa siik, dat hy dy hjoed net helpe kin
no doctor is so ill that he you today not helpe can
No doctor is so ill, that he cannot help you today
b. Elke atleet hat sa hurd traind dat er blessueres krige
every athlete has so hard trained that he injuries got
Every athlete trained so hard that he got injured
References:
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