• Dutch
  • Frisian
  • Afrikaans
Show full table of contents
The position of the infinitival verb in the IPI-construction
quickinfo

Like the imperative, the infinitival verb of the Imperativus-pro-Infinitivo (IPI) must be positioned at the very beginning of the clause.

readmore

The bare infinitival verb of the IPI-construction occurs at the very beginning of the infinitival clause, immediately after the complementiser, as in (1):

Example 1

a. Soe ik sa'n moddersteechje ynslaan en jou my derby?
would I such.a mud.alley in.turn and give me R.with
Should I go into such a muddy alley and join them?
b. Om't God sa goed west hat en jou ús dy tsjinst
because God so good been has and give us that service
Because God has been so good as to give us that service

No element can intervene between the complementiser en and the Bare Infinitival (BI) verb jou:

Example 2

*Om't God sa goed west hat en ús jou dy tsjinst
because God so good been has and us give.BI that service
Because God has been so good as to give us that service

In this respect, what has been called a complementiser is similar to the infinitival marker teto. The infinitival marker teto is always left-adjacent to the infinitival verb, as illustrated below:

Example 3

a. Om't God sa goed west hat om ús dy tsjinst te jaan
because God so good been has for us that service to give.GI
Because God has been so good as to give us that service
b. *Om't God sa goed west hat om ús te dy tsjinst jaan
because God so good been has for us to that service give.GI
Because God has been so good as to give us that service

In this respect, the infinitival marker is similar to the complementiser enand, but this might be an accidental similarity. The two differ with respect to their positioning inside the infinitival clause. The bare infinitive occurs at the beginning of the infinitival, whereas the to-infinitive occurs at the end of the clause, or, more precisely, at the end of the middle field.

References:
    Suggestions for further reading ▼
    phonology
    • Dutch
    • Frisian
    • Afrikaans
    Show more ▼
    morphology
    • Dutch
    • Frisian
    • Afrikaans
    • Strong and other irregular verbs
      [78%] Frisian > Morphology > Inflection > Verbs
    • Weak verbs
      [77%] Frisian > Morphology > Inflection > Verbs
    • -k
      [75%] Frisian > Morphology > Word formation > Derivation > Suffixation > Verbal suffixes > Noun as base
    • General categories
      [75%] Frisian > Morphology > Inflection > Verbs
    • Degree
      [74%] Frisian > Morphology > Inflection > Adjectives
    Show more ▼
    syntax
    • Dutch
    • Frisian
    • Afrikaans
    • 4.4.2. Bare infinitivals
      [82%] Dutch > Syntax > Verbs and Verb Phrases > 4 Projection of verb phrases IIIa:Selection of clauses/verb phrases > 4.4. Three main types of infinitival argument clauses
    • 6.5. Clausal subjects
      [79%] Dutch > Syntax > Adjectives and Adjective Phrases > 6 Predicative use of the adjective phrase
    • 5.2.3.2. Modal verbs
      [79%] Dutch > Syntax > Verbs and Verb Phrases > 5 Projection of verb phrases IIIb:Argument and complementive clauses > 5.2. Infinitival argument clauses > 5.2.3. Bare infinitivals
    • 3.3.3. Infinitival clauses
      [78%] Dutch > Syntax > Nouns and Noun Phrases > 3 Projection of noun phrases II: modification > 3.3. Postmodification
    • 6.2.2. Position of the complementive adjective in the clause
      [78%] Dutch > Syntax > Adjectives and Adjective Phrases > 6 Predicative use of the adjective phrase > 6.2. Complementive use of the adjective
    Show more ▼
    cite
    print