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Words with a coronal as final segment of a four-positional final sequence
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Most words with a four-positional rhyme end in a coronal obstruent. Coronals being the extra-syllabic segments par excellence, this comes as no surprise. Examples of words with such a four-positional rhyme are given in this topic. Furthermore, examples will be given of words ending in -ft and -st which exceed the word maximum.

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Most words with a four-positional rhyme end in a coronal obstruent. Coronals being the extrasyllabic segments par excellence (see extra-syllabic consonants), this comes as no surprise. Examples of words with such a four-positional rhyme are given below:

Example 1

Words which exceed the word maximum with one non-coronal consonant
a. Ending in a long vocalic sequence + /j/ + /t/
(n)oait /(n)o:jt/ (n)ever
b. Ending in a long vocalic sequence + /l/ + /d/
naald /na:ld/ ridge, crest, peak
c. Ending in a long vocalic sequence + /m/ + /t/
deimt /dajmt/ half a hectare
raamt /ra:mt/ casing, frame(work)
d. Ending in a long vocalic sequence + /n/ + /t/
mient /miənt/ starting line
treant /trɪənt/ bumblebee
oant /oənt/ till, until
feint /fajnt/ servant; boyfriend; mate
e. Ending in a long vocalic sequence + /n/ + /d/
weind /vajnd/ headland
eand /ɪənd/ with young, bearing (of ewe)
f. Ending in a long vocalic sequence + /t/ + /s/
taats /ta:ts/ round-headed nail; drawing pin
koerts /kuəts/ course
pleats /plɪəts/ farm
boats /boəts/ tub, barrel
laits(je) /lajts/ to laugh
smeits(je) /smajts/ to taste
g. Ending in a short vowel + /l/ + /t/ + /s/
elts /ɛlts/ each, every; everyone
kwelts (rinne) /kwɛlts/ (to walk) with a limp
Drylts /drilts/ (name of) one of the eleven Frisian cities: IJlst
h. Ending in a (short) rising diphthong + /n/ + /t/ + /s/
hoants /vwants/ ruff; fighting cock
muonts /mwonts/ monk
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Though the final cluster /-nd/ is strongly dispreferred in simplex words (see word-final sequences of a nasal and an obstruent), the words weind and eand (1e) are fine. This is explained by /-d/'s status as an extrasyllabic consonant here.

There are quite a few words in which final /-ft/ and /-st/ are preceded by a long vocalic sequence or − only as far as /-st/ is concerned − by a short vowel + /l/. Examples are listed below:

Example 2

Examples of words ending in -ft and -st which exceed the word maximum
a. Ending in a long vocalic sequence + /f/ + /t/
keeft /ke:ft/ type of cupboard
seaft /sɪəft/ soft
sêft /sɛ:ft/ soft
krêft /krɛ:ft/ strength, power
b. Ending in a long vocalic sequence + /s/ + /t/
taast /ta:st/ touch; fingermark; grasp
beest /be:st/ animal; beast
iest /iəst/ (drying-)kiln
east /ɪəst/ east(erly)
least /lɪəst/ last; footmark
treast /trɪəst/ comfort, consolation
mêst /mɛ:st/ mast
dwêst(e) /dwɛ:st/ to extinguish; to quench
rêst /rɛ:st/ rest; (peace and) quiet
oast /oəst/ gnarl, knur(r)
c. Ending in a short vowel + /l/ + /s/ + /t/
felst /fɛlst/ bog ore
hulst /hølst/ holly, ilex

Subtracting the extra-syllabic final /t/ from these words does not yield a well-formed outcome. The distribution of the fricatives is such that the voiced ones show a preference for being preceded by 'something long' (a long vowel, a falling or centring diphthong, a short vowel and a liquid), while the voiceless ones prefer 'something short' (a short vowel or a rising diphthong) (see the obstruents: the fricatives). In this respect then the above words are exceptional, and problematic. It should be noted that in some dialects krêftstrength, power and sêftsoft have the short vowel /ɛ/, which renders an unproblematic word-final sequence.

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