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Predication
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A predication involves a syntactic phrase that is predicated of another phrase. The Adposition Phrase (PP) is characteristically used as the predicate of a predication, although it may in rare cases be used as the argument of a predication. In the example in (1), the PP is the predicate of a complementive predication:

Example 1

De rôver wie heal yn 'e sûs
the robber was half in the unconsciousness
The robber was in half-drowsy

In the following example, the PP is the subject of a predication:

Example 2

Yn 'e wyn op is gjin noflik foarútsjoch
in the wind up is not.a pleasant prospect
Against the wind is not a pleasant prospect

The following types of predication will be discussed: intransitive complementive predication, transitive complementive predication, supplementive, appositive and PPs as arguments.

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More details about predication can be found by following the corresponding links:

References:
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