• Dutch
  • Frisian
  • Afrikaans
Show full table of contents
Place
quickinfo

The existential quantifier referring to places is the R-pronoun earnesomewhere. Like other R-pronouns, it may function as a PP or as the prepositional complement to a P.

readmore

The form earnesomewhere is not often used anymore in spoken language. It has largely been replaced by ergenssomewhere, which has been borrowed from Dutch. Written Frisian may still feature the old form. The old form may have a plural-like interpretation in the following example, in which it is preceded by the quantifier oarsother, else:

Example 1

a. Se hawwe no wurk yn de yndustry; bgl. de skiphelling of de Volkswagenfabryk te Emden of ek oarsearne: Norden, Aurich, Leer
they have now work in the industry e.g. the shipyard or the Volkswagen.factory at Emden or also else.somewhere Norden Aurich Leer
They now have work in the industry, for example in the shipyard or in the Volkswagen factory at Emden or somewhere else: Norden, Aurich, Leer
b. Hy soe de fyts nimme kinne, of reizgje oars earne hinne mei 't spoar
he would the bike take could or travel other somewhere to with the railroad
He could take the bike or travel by rail somewhere else

The expression is replaced in spoken language by ergens oarssomewhere else, which resembles more closely the Dutch equivalent, ergens anderssomewhere else.

References:
    Suggestions for further reading ▼
    phonology
    • Dutch
    • Frisian
    • Afrikaans
    Show more ▼
    morphology
    • Dutch
    • Frisian
    • Afrikaans
    • Personal pronouns
      [70%] Frisian > Morphology > Inflection > Pronouns
    • Case
      [70%] Frisian > Morphology > Inflection > Nouns
    • Definite Article
      [70%] Frisian > Morphology > Inflection > Articles
    • Degree
      [69%] Frisian > Morphology > Inflection > Adjectives
    • In prenominal position
      [69%] Frisian > Morphology > Inflection > Adjectives
    Show more ▼
    syntax
    • Dutch
    • Frisian
    • Afrikaans
    • Mood
      [68%] Afrikaans > Syntax > Verbs and Verb Phrases > 1. Characterization and classification
    • Clause
      [66%] Afrikaans > Syntax > Adjective Phrases > Complementation > PP
    • R-pronouns
      [66%] Afrikaans > Syntax > Adjective Phrases > Complementation > Quantificational nature of the argument and linear order
    • Tenses
      [66%] Afrikaans > Syntax > Verbs and Verb Phrases > 1. Characterization and classification > 1.5. Tense, epistemic modality and aspect
    • Finite declarative complement clauses: Construction forms
      [66%] Afrikaans > Syntax > Verbs and Verb Phrases > 5. Complement Clauses > 5.1. Finite declarative complement clauses
    Show more ▼
    cite
    print