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The modifier eigenown
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The modifier eigenown is often combined with a possessive pronoun, turning the possessive pronoun into an anaphor. Consider the sentence:

Example 1

Lutske wasket har auto
Lutske washes her car
Lutske washes her car

In the example above, Lutske may be washing her own car or somebody else's . In case eigenown is added to the possessive pronoun, it can only refer back to Lutske:

Example 2

Lutske wasket har eigen auto
Lutske washes her own car
Lutske washes her own car
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The following sentence contains a possessive pronoun that cannot refer back to the subject:

Example 3

Wytse is syn dokter
Wytse is his doctor
Wytse is his doctor

The adjective eigenown turns dokterdoctor into a reflexive predicate:

Example 4

Wytse is syn eigen dokter
Wytse is his own doctor
Wytse is his own doctor

The adjective can be nominalised:

Example 5

a. It eigene
the.NG own
That which is one's own: one's property, one's character
b. De frou liet har eagen gean oer it eigene
the woman let her eyes go over the own
The woman let her eyes wander over her property
c. De Joaden fan Egypte wurde oproppen om it Joadsk eigene te bewarjen
the Jews of Egypt are exhorted for the Jewish own to preserve
The Jews of Egypt are exhorted to preserve the Jewish character
d. It wichtichste fan it Frysk-eigene is de Fryske taal
the most.important of the Frisian-own is the Frisian language
The most important part of Frisian culture is the Frisian language
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