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Geographical names
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Some geographical names such as names of cities and villages are used without the article unless they are modified.

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Modification characteristically occurs if the proper name can be ambiguous. The example below involves an unambiguous use of the geographical name. As expected, the article is absent.

Example 1

a. Drachten is gjin moaie stêd
Drachten is no beautiful town
Drachten is not a beautiful town
b. *It Drachten is gjin moaie stêd
the Drachten is no beautiful town
Drachten is not a beautiful town

The example below involves potentially ambiguous use of the geographical name, which is made unambiguous by adding a modifier in the form of an Adposition Phrase (PP). As a consequence, the article must be present:

Example 2

a. Sa sjocht it Drachten fan myn dreamen derút
so looks the Drachten of my dreams R.out
That is what the Drachten of my dreams looks like
b. *Sa sjocht Drachten fan myn dreamen derút
so looks Drachten of my dreams R.out
That is what the Drachten of my dreams looks like

If geographical names are accompanied by the definite article, it is invariably the article of the neuter gender that is involved.

References:
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