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Meaning
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The partitive question is ambiguous between a kind interpretation and a specific object interpretation.

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The example below can be used to illustrate that the partitive question is ambiguous between a kind reading and a specific object reading:

Example 1

Wat foar boek hasto kocht?
what for book have.2SG bought
What kind of book did you buy?

The answer to such a question could be the naming of a genre, as below:

Example 2

In spiritueel boek
a spiritual book
A spiritual book

The answer to such a question could also be a specific book:

Example 3

De 'Brihadaranyaka Upanishad'
the Brihadaranyaka Upanishad
The 'Brihadaranyaka Upanishad'

Partitive questions are therefore ambiguous between these two readings.

The personal question word wawho cannot be used in this construction. The word watwhat can also be used with persons:

Example 4

a. *Wa foar minsken?
who for people
What kind of people?
b. Wat foar minsken?
what for people
What kind of people?
References:
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