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Type of relative clause: restrictive or non-restrictive
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Commonly, two types of relative clauses are distinguished: restrictive and non-restrictive. A restrictive relative clause takes the Noun Phrase (NP) following a quantifier as its antecedent. In the example below, the relative clause has been bracketed together with its antecedent:

Example 1

Gjin [learling dy't sûn is], hoecht nei de dokter ta
no pupil who healthy is needs to the physician PTC
No pupil who is healthy needs to see a physician

A non-restrictive relative clause takes the NP including the quantifier as its antecedent. In the example below, the non-restrictive relative clause has been bracketed together with its antecedent:

Example 2

[De twa learlingen, dy't er graach mocht,] laken om syn grapkes
the two pupils who he eagerly might laughed at his jokes
The two pupils, whom he liked a lot, laughed at his jokes
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Restrictive relative clauses can be distinguished from non-restrictive relative clauses with respect to the following properties:

References:
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