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The genitive possessive construction
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Proper nouns are the only nouns which can be realised in the genitive.

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Proper names can be realised in the genitive by the addition of a suffix consisting of an alveolar fricative:

Example 1

It is Auke-s boek
it is Auke.GEN book
It is Auke's book

Other nouns can not be receive the genitive suffix:

Example 2

*It is dy jonge-s boek
it is that boy.GEN book
It is that boy's book

A bookish relative can be formed, which is chiefly found in written language. It is the genitive form waanswhose, homophonous with the question word waans, which is the genitive of the question pronoun wawho. An example of this relative pronoun is given below:

Example 3

Op God, waans wurd ik priizje, op God betrou ik sûnder freze
in God whose word I praise in God trust I without fear
In God whose word I praise, in God I trust without fear

The pronoun waanswhose almost always has a person as its antecedent, although the Frisian Language Corpus contains one bookish example, which sounds unnatural, involving a non-personal antecedent:

Example 4

De wiete simmer fan 1903, waans likense yn dizze ieu faaks net komme sil
the wet summer of 1903 whose equal in this century perhaps not come shall
The wet summer of 1903, which will perhaps be without equal in this century

A possible indication of Dutch interference is the fact that the complementiser is systematically absent at the beginning of the relative clause in case it is built on this genitival relative pronoun.

References:
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