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Complex APs
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Adjectives accompanied by a Adposition Phrase (PP), especially present and past participles and pseudo-participles, can occur following the noun, while retaining a restrictive interpretation.

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The option of postnominal placement while retaining a restrictive interpretation is excluded for simple Adjective Phrases (APs), that is, APs which are not accompanied by arguments. A minimal pair is given below:

Example 1

a. Famkes op him fereale kinne in tút fan him krije
girls with him enamoured can a kiss of him get
Girls in love with him can get a kiss from him
b. *Famkes fereale kinne in tút fan him krije
girls enamoured can a kiss of him get
Girls in love can get a kiss from him

Prenominal placement of a simple adjective is of course grammatical:

Example 2

Fereale famkes kinne in tút fan him krije
enamoured girls can a kiss of him get
Girls in love can get a kiss from him

Post nominal placement of the AP is often somewhat bookish. Spoken language will normally feature a full-fledged relative clause:

Example 3

Famkes dy't fereale op him binne
girls who enamoured with him are
Girls who are in love with him

The following example sounds natural in written language. This example again illustrates that post-nominal complex APs can have a restrictive interpretation:

Example 4

a. Gjin berntsjes boartsjend om har hinne soe se sjen
no children playing around her around would she see
No children playing around her would she see
b. *Gjin berntsjes boartsjend soe se sjen
no children playing would she see
No children playing would she see

Post-nominal APs do not exhibit agreement with the noun:

Example 5

a. Gjin berntsjes bliid har te sjen soe se ha
no children happy her to see would she have
No children happy to see her, she would have
b. *Gjin berntsjes blide har te sjen soe se ha
no children happy.AGR her to see would she have
No children happy to see her, she would have
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