• Dutch
  • Frisian
  • Afrikaans
Show full table of contents
Converted to N
quickinfo

Present participles can be converted to common nouns, albeit with marginal results.

readmore

Present participles can be converted to common nouns, albeit with marginal results, though this process is much less productive than in Dutch. On the whole, a different construction is preferred. In the example below, a relative clause is preferred:

Example 1

a. ?Der binne twa wachtsjenden foar jo
there are two waiting before you
Hold the line, there are two before you
b. Der binne twa lju dy't wachtsje foar jo
there are two people who wait before you
Hold the line, there are two people before you

In the example below, a different suffix, -er, is used for nominal conversion:

Example 2

a. ?Twa wenningsykjenden
two house.seeking.PL
Two house hunters
b. Twa wenningsikers
two house.seeker.PL
Two house hunters

Present participles can be converted to neuter nouns, though this is rare and sounds stilted. The present participle wêzendebeing only occurs once as a nominalization in the Frisian Language Corpus. The relative clause below refers back to the Noun Phrase (NP) it kommende jierthe coming year:

Example 3

Dat no syn tried spûn twisken it wêzende en it kommende
which now his thread spun between the being and the coming
Which now spun its thread between what was and what would come
[show extra information]
x Literature

More details can be found in Hoekstra (1987).

References:
  • Hoekstra, Jarich1987Ynsitters en wenningsikers?Friesch Dagblad03-10Taalsnipels 49
Suggestions for further reading ▼
phonology
  • Dutch
  • Frisian
  • Afrikaans
Show more ▼
morphology
  • Dutch
  • Frisian
  • Afrikaans
Show more ▼
syntax
  • Dutch
  • Frisian
  • Afrikaans
  • 9.3.2. Supplementive use
    [66%] Dutch > Syntax > Adjectives and Adjective Phrases > 9 Participles and infinitives: their adjectival use > 9.3. Predicative use
  • 1.3.1.4. Circumpositions
    [65%] Dutch > Syntax > Adpositions and adpositional phrases > 1 Characteristics and classification > 1.3. A semantic classification of adpositional phrases > 1.3.1. Spatial adpositions
  • 3.3.2.2. The form and function of the relative elements
    [65%] Dutch > Syntax > Nouns and Noun Phrases > 3 Projection of noun phrases II: modification > 3.3. Postmodification > 3.3.2. Relative clauses
  • 3.3.6. Adverbial postmodification
    [63%] Dutch > Syntax > Nouns and Noun Phrases > 3 Projection of noun phrases II: modification > 3.3. Postmodification
  • 1.2.1. Proper nouns
    [63%] Dutch > Syntax > Nouns and Noun Phrases > 1 Characterization and classification > 1.2. Classification
  • Clause
    [64%] Frisian > Syntax > Adjective Phrases > Complementation > PPs
  • Collective nouns
    [63%] Frisian > Syntax > Nouns & Noun Phrases > Partitive noun constructions > Referential partitive constructions > Three types
  • Metaphor
    [63%] Frisian > Syntax > Adjective Phrases > Comparison by degree > Equative
  • No NP-complements
    [63%] Frisian > Syntax > Adposition Phrases > Complementation > Postpositions + simple complements > No complements to postpositions
  • Preposition + neuter nominal adjective
    [63%] Frisian > Syntax > Adjective Phrases > Modification and degree quantification > Others > APs as PPs
  • Clause
    [63%] Afrikaans > Syntax > Adjective Phrases > Complementation > PP
  • Tenses
    [61%] Afrikaans > Syntax > Verbs and Verb Phrases > 1. Characterization and classification > 1.5. Tense, epistemic modality and aspect
  • Mood
    [60%] Afrikaans > Syntax > Verbs and Verb Phrases > 1. Characterization and classification
  • Inflection and derivation
    [57%] Afrikaans > Syntax > Verbs and Verb Phrases > 1. Characterization and classification
  • Finite declarative complement clauses: Syntactic distribution
    [57%] Afrikaans > Syntax > Verbs and Verb Phrases > 5. Complement Clauses > 5.1. Finite declarative complement clauses
Show more ▼
cite
print