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Discontinuity
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Oarsother, else may display discontinuity from its nominal quantifier.

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The quantificational adjective oarother behaves differently from ordinary adjectives with respect to the partitive. It may be separated from its nominal quantifier whereas other adjectives may not:

Example 1

a. Ik ha wol wat oars te dwaan
I have indeed something else to do
I have something better to do
b. Ik ha oars wol wat te dwaan
I have else indeed something to do
I have enough things to do
c. Ik ha wol wat dreechs te dwaan
I have indeed something heavy to do
I have something heavy to do
d. *Ik ha dreechs wol wat te dwaan
I have heavy indeed something to do
I have indeed something heavy to do

This type of discontinuity is different from the one displayed by relative quantifiers and partitive adjectives. In the latter case, the partitive adjective was topicalised to the beginning of the sentence. The examples above with oarsother involves Verb Phrase (VP)-internal topicalisation. Topicalisation of oarsother to sentence-initial position is ungrammatical under the intended interpretation:

Example 2

*Oars ha ik wol wat te dwaan
else have I indeed something to do
Else I have something to do

The above sentence can be grammatically construed if oars is interpreted as a sentence adverb meaning otherwise, but that does not involve discontinuity with the nominal quantifier. Discontinuity is unacceptable in case the nominal quantifier wat is embedded in an Adposition Phrase (PP), as in the ungrammatical sentence below:

Example 3

a. Ik wol oer wat oars prate
I want about something else talk
I want to talk about something else
b. *Ik wol oars oer wat prate
I want else about something talk
I want to talk about something else

The construction can be saved in case the nominal quantifier is turned into an adverbial R-pronoun, which may characteristically occur outside the PP as in the sentence below:

Example 4

Ik wol oars earne oer prate
I want else something-R about talk
I want to talk about something else

Examples like the one above are old-fashioned. The use of the R-pronouns earnesomewhere and nearnenowhere is restricted to written language anyhow and to older Frisian. Things are different with the quantifier neatnothing, which allows discontinuity with respect to oarselse in case it occurs in a PP, as (5b) shows:

Example 5

a. Ik wol oer neat oars prate
I want about nothing else talk
I do not want to talk about anything else
b. Ik wol oars oer neat prate
I want else about nothing talk
I do not want to talk about anything

In the sentence below, the nominal quantifier neatnothing is turned, as far as its form is concerned, into the adverbial R-pronoun nearnenowhere, see also R-pronouns and indefinite expletive der:

Example 6

Ik wol oars nearne oer prate
I want else nowhere.R about talk
I do not want to talk about anything else
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