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PP
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It seems that Adposition Phrases (PPs) can be the subject of a predication.

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Taken at face value, sentences like the one below show that PPs can be the subject of a predication:

Example 1

Hjir lâns is koarter
R-this along is shorter
Along here is shorter

Sentences like the one below seem to involve an anticipatory pronoun hetit that is coreferential with a following PP, effectively rendering the PP the subject of the predication:

Example 2

Ik fyn it te waarm [yn Rome]
I find it too hot in Rome
I find it too hot in Rome

It is controversial whether a PP can be the argument of a predication.

References:
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