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Equative and comparative
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Equatives may also take the form of circumadjectival sequences, in which the adjective is followed by a phrase.

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Equatives may also take the form of circumadjectival sequences, in which the adjective is followed by a phrase. An example is given below:

Example 1

Like freonlik as him
as friendly as him
As friendly as him

The construction cannot be used prenominally, although it is fine in case the post-adjectival part of the circummodification occurs after the noun, as shown below:

Example 2

a. *In [like freonlik-e as Kris] learaar
an as friendly.CG as Kris teacher
A teacher as friendly as Kris
b. In like freonlik-e learaar as Kris
an as friendly.CG teacher as Kris
A teacher as friendly as Kris

The ungrammatical example above cannot be saved by any permutation of the elements within the bracketed string. The same facts can be observed in the case of the comparative:

Example 3

a. Freonlik-er as him
friendly.CPR than him
Friendlier than him
b. *In [freonlik-er as him] learaar
a friendly.CPR than him teacher
A friendlier teacher than him
c. In [freonlik-er ] learaar as him
a friendly.CPR teacher than him
A friendlier teacher than him

The comparative never features a circumposition, that is, it is never periphrastic. It consists of a suffix attached to the adjective and a phrase. In spite of this structural difference with the equative, the same facts obtain, which justifies theoretical analyses assigning the same structure to both. It seems that arguments of the prenominal adjective may not appear postnominally, whereas arguments or subcategorized phrasal parts of the adjectival modification may appear postnominally.

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