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Attributive or internal to a compound
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A sequence of two adjectives before a following noun is potentially ambiguous just in case an indefinite singular neuter is involved.

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A sequence of two adjectives before a following noun is potentially ambiguous just in case an indefinite singular neuter is involved. The second adjective can either be analysed as an attributive adjective, as in (a) or as an adjective that forms a compound with the following noun, as in (b):

Example 1

a. In read boarstke
a red breast.NG
A red breast
b. In readboarstke
a red.breast
A robin

Even in this type, the intonation pattern usually distinguishes between these two cases, falling on the noun in the case of an attributive construction, and on the adjective in the case of a compound. In other cases than strong agreement in the neuter singular, there is no ambiguity.

Example 2

a. Twa read-e boarstkes
two red.PL breast.PL
Two read breasts
b. Twa readboarstkes
two red.breasts
Two robins
References:
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