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The equative complement is a metaphor
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The equative construction may have a complement which causes a high degree reading of the adjective by means of a metaphor.

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The equative construction may have a complement which causes a high degree reading of the adjective by virtue of a metaphor. These metaphors tend to be conventional, although there is a fair amount of regional variation. Two examples are given below:

Example 1

a. Sa drunken as in kroade
as drunk as a wheelbarrow
Very drunk
b. Sa gek as in sint
as crazy as a penny
Very crazy

The metaphor itself does not need to have any logical relation to the thing it is compared to. Any absurd, creatively coined comparison is automatically interpreted as a high degree reading on the adjective:

Example 2

Sa dronken as in âlde frachtwein dy't keurd wurde moat
as drunk as an old truck that inspected be must
As drunk as old truck that must be inspected (for the motor vehicle inspection)
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More details can be found in Hoekstra (1999) and Hoekstra (2000).

References:
  • Hoekstra, Eric1999Zo dronken als een kruiwagen en andere metaforenHet DialectenboekGroesbeekStichting Nederlandse Dialecten
  • Hoekstra, Eric2000Dronkene kroadenFriesch Dagblad12-02Taalgenoat en taalgeniet 1
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