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Lower degree equative
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A negated form of the equative can be interpreted as a lower degree equative. It consists of a function word with an equative negative interpretation followed by the adjective.

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At first sight, a lower degree equative seems impossible, since it involves two elements which have the same degree. However, it is possible in the negated form of the equative, in which the two elements compared both fail to come up to the positive degree of the adjective. This is illustrated by the following pair:

Example 1

a. Rintsje is like tûk as Ids
Rintsje is as smart as Ids
Rintsje is as smart as Ids
b. Rintsje is likemin tûk as Ids
Rintsje is as.bad smart as Ids
Rintsje is not any more stupid than Ids

The latter sentence is a good example of a lower degree equative: both arguments have the same low degree with respect to the adjective. The word likemin can also be used as a sentence adverb meaning neither.

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