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Lowest degree superlative
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The superlative is normally used to express the highest degree (maximative). However, it is also possible to express the opposite relation, that is the lowest degree (minimative).

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The superlative is normally used to express the highest degree (maximative). However, it is also possible to express the opposite relation, that is the lowest degree (minimative):

Example 1

a. Wytze is it tûkst
Wytze is the smartest
Wytze is the smartest
b. Rintsje is it minst tûk
Rintsje is the least smart
Rintsje is the least smart

The minimative is always formed by putting the words it minstthe least in front of the adjective, just as the maximative may be formed by putting the words it meastthe most in front of the adjective. However, the maximative can also be formed by putting the morpheme -st after the adjective, but there is no comparable morphological means of forming a minimative, nor are there irregular minimatives.

References:
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