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Classification of degree modifiers
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Adjectives can be modified by intensifiers and adverbial degree words. There are three different degrees of intensification, although the demarcation between them may be somewhat fuzzy.

Amplifying intensifiers or amplifiers cause a high degree interpretation of the adjective:

Example 1

Tige hoeden
very cautious
Very cautious

Downtoning intensifiers or downtoners cause a low degree interpretation of the adjective:

Example 2

Wat hoeden
somewhat cautious
A bit cautious

Neutralising intensifiers or neutralisers cause a medium degree interpretation on the adjective:

Example 3

Betrekkelik hoeden
relatively cautious
Relatively cautious

Adverbial degree words can be questioned, as shown in the example below:

Example 4

Hoe hoeden
how cautious
How cautious

The adverbial degree modifier can be universally quantified if the meaning of the adjective allows this, which is shown in the example below:

Example 5

Hielendal read
completely red
Completely red

An approximate degree can be expressed, as shown in the example below:

Example 6

Hast klear
almost ready
Almost ready

A small group of adjectives allows a more exact type of intensification in the form of a measure phrase, yielding an exact degree, as shown in the example:

Example 7

Twa meter lang
two meters tall
Two feet tall

Adjectives can be negated, as shown below:

Example 8

Net read
not red
Not red

Adjectives can be modified by process quantifiers.

A high degree can be pronominalised by means of the word saso.

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Morde details about the classification of degree modifiers can be found by following the corresponding links:

References:
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