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Clause
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The prepositional complement of the adjective may be realised as a dummy pronoun which anticipates a following clause, as in the example below:

Example 1

Ten Have is der bliid mei dat Tjeu ek komt
Ten have is R happy with that Tjeu also comes
Ten Have is happy (with it) that Tjeu comes also
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The prepositional complement of the adjective may be realised as a clause, which is related to the selected Adposition Phrase (PP). In some cases, the related PP can be dropped. In the example below, the finite clause is related to the discontinuous PP consisting of the preposition meiwith and the R-pronoun derthere, it:

Example 2

a. Ten Have is bliid dat Tjeu ek komt
Ten have is happy that Tjeu also comes
Ten Have is happy that Tjeu comes also
b. Ten Have is der bliid mei dat Tjeu ek komt
Ten Have is R happy with that Tjeu also comes
Ten Have is happy that Tjeu is also coming

Dropping the PP is only allowed in case the clause occurs in the postverbal field. If the clause is preposed to the beginning of the sentence, the PP must be present:

Example 3

a. *[Dat Tjeu ek komt] is Ten Have bliid
that Tjeu also comes is Ten Have happy
That Tjeu is also coming, Ten Have is happy about
b. [Dat Tjeu ek komt] is Ten Have bliid mei
that Tjeu also comes is Ten Have happy with
That Tjeu is also coming, Ten Have is happy about
c. [Dat Tjeu ek komt] dêr is Ten Have bliid mei
that Tjeu also comes R is Ten Have happy with
Ten Have is happy about the fact that Tjeu is also coming

The sentences above also show that in the case of a preposed clause, the R-pronoun dêrthere, it need not be phonologically realised.

Dropping the PP is only allowed with adjectives that take an optional PP anyhow. In other cases, the occurrence of the PP is obligatory. In the example below, the PP cannot be dropped without a change of meaning, and correspondingly, it must also be present in case a finite clause is present. In the following example, the related PP cannot be dropped in the presence of a clause.

Example 4

a. *Ten Have is siik dat Tjeu komt
Ten Have is sick that Tjeu comes
Ten Have is disgusted by Tjeu's coming
b. Ten Have is der siik fan dat Tjeu komt
Ten Have is R Sick of that Tjeu comes
Ten Have is disgusted by Tjeu's coming

This may be related to the fact that dropping the PP leads to a non-monotonic change in meaning. This is illustrated below, where the first sentence does not entail the second:

Example 5

a. *Ten Have is der siik fan
Ten Have is R sick of
Ten Have is sick of it
b. Ten Have is siik
Ten Have is sick
Ten Have is sick

Although the clause can in theory also be realised as an infinitival clause, this is in actual practice a somewhat marginal, in the sense of infrequent, option, which is likely to be an interference from Dutch.

References:
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    • 6.6. PP subjects
      [88%] Dutch > Syntax > Adjectives and Adjective Phrases > 6 Predicative use of the adjective phrase
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