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-ens
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The most prominent suffixes to derive nouns from adjectives are -ens, -heid and -ichheid. These suffixes are related, and will therefore be dealt with in a single topic. Within this triple, -ens, which is etymologically related to English -ness, is used for pure transpositions of the adjective to a noun, which then has the abtract meaning 'property of being A'. An example is swietsweet > swietenssweetness. Phonologically, -ens has a preference for bases with a stressed final syllable.

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The suffixes -ens, -heid and -ichheid are treated in a common topic.

References:
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