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Noun as base
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Suffixation of nouns in order to create adverbs can serve two goals. One is to express a manner in which the noun is involved. There is only one suffix that is relevant, i.e. -(e)lings, and this suffix is also unproductive. An example of the pattern is eachlingsright in the face, from eacheye.

The main function of suffixation is to use nouns denoting a time period, for example jûnevening, in an adverbial way. The main suffix here is -s. In this way, we get a derivation like jûnsin the evening. The suffix has regular allomorphs in the shape of -e and -es. Idiosynchratic suffixes are -mis and -ich. There is also the suffix -liks, which has a distributive function, for example wykliksweek-SUFFevery week. Its set of possible bases is restricted, however.

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More details about these suffixes can be found by following the corresponding links:

References:
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